Volume 5, Issue 1-1, February 2017, Page: 7-12
Seroprevalence and Knowledge of Hepatitis B and C Among Health Care Workers in a Specialist Hospital in Nigeria
Olorunfemi Akinbode Ogundele, Department of Community Health and Primary Care, State Specialist Hospital, Ondo City, Ondo State, Nigeria
Abimbola Olorunsola, Department of Family Medicine, State Specialist Hospital, Ondo City, Ondo State, Nigeria
Babatola Bakare, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mother and Child Hospital, Ondo City, Ondo State, Nigeria
Isaac Adedokun Adegoke, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, State Specialist Hospital, Ondo City, Ondo State, Nigeria
Tolulope Ogundele, Department of Paediatrics, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria
Funmito Omolola Fehintola, Department of Community Medicine, Bowen University Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
Sunday Okotie, Department of Nursing Services, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria
Received: Apr. 13, 2016;       Accepted: Apr. 14, 2016;       Published: Apr. 11, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ejpm.s.2017050101.12      View  1852      Downloads  79
Abstract
Hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) remain a global health challenge. Health care workers (HCWs) are at high risk of contracting HBV and HCV through their occupation. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and assess knowledge of HBV and HCV infection among HCWs in a specialist hospital, Southwest, Nigeria. A hospital based, descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among 209 HCWs at a specialist hospital in Ondo State, Nigeria. Data on knowledge of HBV and HCV was collected using a structured, self-administered pretested questionnaire. Blood samples were screened for Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HCV antibodies. Data was analysed using SPSS version 20.0. The prevalence of HBsAg was 6.7%, anti-HCV positivity was 8.1% and co-infection of both HBV and HCV was ̴1.0%. No statistically significant difference exist in the prevalence of HBV (χ2= 2.07, p=0.155) and HCV (χ2= 2.26, p=0.132) between at risk HCW and not at risk HCW. Work duration was the only factor associated with HBV (χ2= 10.24, p=0.006) and HCV (χ2= 13.61, p=0.001) positivity and knowledge score (χ2= 8.06, p= 0.018). Knowledge about HBV and HCV was relatively high. Eighty-nine percent ever heard of HBV and 75.6% ever heard of HCV. This study found a high prevalence of HBV and HCV among this group of HCWs and a higher burden of HCV than was commonly reported. Knowledge of HBV and HCV was also high. There is a need for infection control programme and sustained health education among HCWs.
Keywords
Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Health Care Workers, Nigeria
To cite this article
Olorunfemi Akinbode Ogundele, Abimbola Olorunsola, Babatola Bakare, Isaac Adedokun Adegoke, Tolulope Ogundele, Funmito Omolola Fehintola, Sunday Okotie, Seroprevalence and Knowledge of Hepatitis B and C Among Health Care Workers in a Specialist Hospital in Nigeria, European Journal of Preventive Medicine. Special Issue: Health Care Workers and Globally Emerging Infectious Diseases. Vol. 5, No. 1-1, 2017, pp. 7-12. doi: 10.11648/j.ejpm.s.2017050101.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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