Volume 8, Issue 5, September 2020, Page: 91-96
Evaluating the Preparedness of Child Health Facilities and Health Care Providers to COVID 19 Pandemic
Abideen Salako, Clinical Sciences Department, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria
Oluwatosin Odubela, Clinical Sciences Department, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria
Tomilola Musari-Martins, Clinical Sciences Department, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria
Zaidat Musa, Monitoring and Evaluation Unit, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria
Titilola Gbaja-Biamila, Clinical Sciences Department, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria
Babasola Opaneye, Clinical Sciences Department, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria
David Oladele, Clinical Sciences Department, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria
Priscilla Ezemelue, Clinical Sciences Department, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria
Harry Ohwodo, Clinical Sciences Department, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria
Oliver Ezechi, Clinical Sciences Department, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria
Agatha David, Clinical Sciences Department, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria
Received: Sep. 10, 2020;       Accepted: Oct. 9, 2020;       Published: Oct. 17, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20200805.16      View  74      Downloads  75
Abstract
The challenges of diagnosis of SARS-CoV2 infection in the paediatric population includes not only the mild nature of the disease, but the similarity in the symptomatology of the COVID-19 disease to common childhood illness, and the possibility that the infected children could be “silent transmitters” to the family members and health care workers [HCW]. The challenge raises the doubt on the level of preparedness, awareness of the child health facilities [HCF], and HCW in adopting measures at combatting the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This study evaluated the preparedness and response of HCF and HCW in paediatric settings to the 2019-novel coronavirus pandemic. A cross-sectional study involving child HCF and HCW. An online tool was used to evaluate preparedness for the management of infectious disease outbreaks as typified by the COVID-19 Outbreak. The information collected included demographic characteristics of the health personnel providing care for children, infection control practices, knowledge, and preparedness for prevention of COVID-19. Data generated were analyzed using the SPSS version 23.0. A majority of respondents were medical doctors (89%), practicing for >5years (75%), and in public health care facilities (69%). A significant proportion of the health facilities had an infectious disease unit (68%) and policy on disease outbreak (60%) in place. 144 (96%) respondents knew SARS-CoV-2 was responsible for COVID-19 and the incubation period was an average of 2 – 14 days. Most of the respondents were aware that the disease could be with or without symptoms (86%), as well as mimic other childhood illnesses (93%). Most of the centres (55%) had fair policy strength towards combating the disease. IPC policies have been established in most paediatric facilities to combat the recurring threat of communicable disease outbreaks. There is a need for further scaling up of resources to address the COVID-19 pandemic.
Keywords
Preparedness, Health Facilities, Coronavirus Disease
To cite this article
Abideen Salako, Oluwatosin Odubela, Tomilola Musari-Martins, Zaidat Musa, Titilola Gbaja-Biamila, Babasola Opaneye, David Oladele, Priscilla Ezemelue, Harry Ohwodo, Oliver Ezechi, Agatha David, Evaluating the Preparedness of Child Health Facilities and Health Care Providers to COVID 19 Pandemic, European Journal of Preventive Medicine. Vol. 8, No. 5, 2020, pp. 91-96. doi: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20200805.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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