Volume 7, Issue 3, May 2019, Page: 65-70
Status of Sanitation Facilities and Hygiene Practices in Yakurr Local Government Area, Cross River State, Nigeria
Ibiang Arikpo Oka, Department of Microbiology, Cross River University of Technology, Calabar, Nigeria
Nurudeen Sobowale Olaniran, Department of Public Health, Babcock University, Illishan-Remo, Nigeria
Ozah Hosea Peter, Department of Public Health, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria
Received: Jun. 6, 2019;       Accepted: Jul. 9, 2019;       Published: Jul. 26, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20190703.12      View  116      Downloads  15
Abstract
The study was a descriptive study, designed to describe the status of sanitation facilities and hygiene practices in Yakurr Local Government Area, Cross River State, Nigeria. Five communities were selected by simple random sampling for the study. Multi-stage random sampling technique which involved four stages was used to select 410 households and structured questionnaire, observation and key-informant interview were used for data collection. The statistical package for social sciences software (SPSS version 20) and MS Excel (2010) were used for data analysis. Results from the study shows that 46.1% of respondents used borehole water as main source of water. Basic types of toilet facilities available in the studied communities were inadequate and substandard; this further compound the already existing poor sanitation and unsafe hygiene practices (26.6% traditional pit latrine). Approximately 52.9% of respondents had handwashing stand to wash hands after defecating while 5.4% used basin with tap for handwashing. 53.9% of respondents washed hands with water only, while 45.6% of respondents washed hands with soap. The lack of access to potable water supply and toilet facilities could affect the general hygiene status of the communities. It was recommended among others that the government should provide more basic sanitary facilities and adequate potable water. Good personal and community hygiene requires sufficient water and basic sanitary facilities.
Keywords
Sanitation Facilities, Hygiene Practices, Communities
To cite this article
Ibiang Arikpo Oka, Nurudeen Sobowale Olaniran, Ozah Hosea Peter, Status of Sanitation Facilities and Hygiene Practices in Yakurr Local Government Area, Cross River State, Nigeria, European Journal of Preventive Medicine. Vol. 7, No. 3, 2019, pp. 65-70. doi: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20190703.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
UNICEF/WHO (2008): Joint Monitory Program for Water Supply and Sanitation. New York UNICEF and Geneva, WHO.
[2]
WHO (2004): Water, Sanitation and Hygiene link in Health. Fact and Figures. Geneva, WHO.
[3]
NPC (2004). Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2003.
[4]
Prasetyoputra, P. & Irinti, S. (2013). Access to Improved Sanitation Facilities in Indonesia: An Econometric Analysis of Geographical and Socioeconomic Disparities. Journal of Applied Sciences in Environmental Sanitation, (3), 215–224.
[5]
Adams, E. A., Boateng, G. O. & Amoyaw, J. A. (2016). Socioeconomic and demographic predictors of potable water and sanitation access in Ghana. Social Indicator Research, 126 (2), 673–687.
[6]
Yohannes, T., Workicho, A. & Asefa, H. A. (2016). Cross Sectional Study: Availability of Improved Sanitation Facilities and Associated Factors among Rural Communities in Lemo Woreda, Hadiya Zone, Southern Ethiopia. Open Access Library Journal, 1 (8), 1-10.
[7]
Tumwebaze, I. K., Orach, C. G., Niwagaba, C., Luthi, C. & Mosler, H. J. (2013). Sanitation facilities in Kampala slums, Uganda: Users’ satisfaction and determinant factors. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 23 (3), 191–204.
[8]
WHO/UNICEF (2015). Progress on Sanitation and Drinking Water: 2015 Update and MDG Assessment. Geneva and New York: WHO and UNICEF.
[9]
Aremu, A. S. (2012). Assessment of Sanitation Facilities in Primary Schools within Ilorin, Nigeria. Journal of Applied Sciences in Environmental Sanitation, 7 (1), 29-33.
[10]
Luthi, C. (2012). Community-based environmental sanitation planning approaches for the South: the household centred approach. Berlin.
[11]
Nwankwo, B. (2011). Evaluation of Environmental Sanitation in Owerri Municipal Council of Imo state. Research Journal of Medical Science 3 (4), 137-140.
[12]
Okoi-uyouyo. (2002). Yakurr systems of kinship, family and marriages 98.
[13]
Amina J. J (2005). MDGs and the city Nigeria Experience. Paper presented at the Common Wealth Association Planner’s Workshop, Abuja Nigeria.
[14]
Aremu, A. S. (2012). Assessment of Sanitation Facilities in Primary Schools within Ilorin, Nigeria. Journal of Applied Sciences in Environmental Sanitation, 7 (1), 29-33.
[15]
Luthi, C. (2012). Community-based environmental sanitation planning approaches for the South: the household centred approach. Berlin.
[16]
Nwankwo, B. (2011). Evaluation of Environmental Sanitation in Owerri Municipal Council of Imo state. Research Journal of Medical Science 3 (4), 137-140.
[17]
World Bank (2005): The handwashing handbook: A guide for developing a hygiene promotion program to increase handwashing with soap. Washington, D. C, World Bank Group.
[18]
Adefunke O, Folashade O, Omokhodion, and Joshua FO (1998): Environmental and Personal Hygiene Practices: Risk Factors for Diarrhoea among Children of Nigeria Market Women. J Diarrhoeal Dis Res 4: 241-247.
Browse journals by subject