Volume 4, Issue 2, March 2016, Page: 32-38
Assessment of Magnitude and Factors Associated with Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinic of Adama Town Health Facilities, Central Ethiopia
Abel Girmay Mekuaninte, Mariestopes International Ethiopia, Adama, Ethiopia
Alemayehu Worku, Addis Continental Institute of Public Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Dawit Jember Tesfaye, Department of Clinical Nursing, Hossana College of Health Sciences, Hossana, Ethiopia
Received: Dec. 20, 2015;       Accepted: Dec. 27, 2015;       Published: Mar. 16, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20160402.12      View  3744      Downloads  109
Abstract
Maternal mortality is a substantial public health burden in developing countries. Birth preparedness and complication readiness is a safe motherhood strategy which addresses delays that could increase the risk of dying in pregnancy, child birth and the immediate postpartum period. The main aim of this study was to assess magnitude and factors associated with birth preparedness and complication readiness among pregnant women attending antenatal care clinic in Adama town government health facilities, central Ethiopia, 2015. A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted by interviewing 642 pregnant mothers from December 2014 to January 2015 in ANC clinic of Adama town government health facilities. Systematic random sampling was employed to select the study subject. Data were collected using structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the study variables. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with birth preparedness and complication readiness practice. P-value < 0.05 was used as cut of value for statistical significance. Out of 642 mothers only 29.1% (95% C/I: 25.9, 32.7) of the respondents were prepared for birth and its complications. Preparation for birth and its complication was associated with respondent who attended secondary and above educational level (AOR=2.76, 95%C/I: 1.41, 5.41). Women who had experience of one still birth (AOR=2.3, 95%C/I: 1.20, 4.63) and those pregnant women who heard the term birth preparedness (AOR=1.56, 95%C/I: 1.03, 2.38) were found to be factors associated with birth preparedness and complication readiness practice. The magnitude of birth preparedness and complication readiness was low in the study area. Knowledge on birth preparedness and complication readiness was identified as low as danger sign. Counseling related to knowledge on birth preparedness and complication readiness with especial emphasis to danger sign during pregnancy, labour and delivery needs due attention.
Keywords
Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness, Pregnant Women, Antenatal Care
To cite this article
Abel Girmay Mekuaninte, Alemayehu Worku, Dawit Jember Tesfaye, Assessment of Magnitude and Factors Associated with Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinic of Adama Town Health Facilities, Central Ethiopia, European Journal of Preventive Medicine. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2016, pp. 32-38. doi: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20160402.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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