Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2014, Page: 81-89
Essential Hypertension in Adult Nigerians in a Primary Care Clinic: A Cross Sectional Study of the Prevalence and Associated Family Socio-Biological Factors in Eastern Nigeria
Gabriel Uche Pascal Iloh, Departments of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Abia state, Nigeria and Department of Public Health Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Agwu Nkwa Amadi, Department of Public Health Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
Received: Sep. 25, 2014;       Accepted: Oct. 10, 2014;       Published: Oct. 30, 2014
DOI: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20140206.11      View  2517      Downloads  192
Abstract
Background: The prevalence of hypertension in primary care setting is showing an upward trend. However, the occurrence of hypertension is a reflection of not only family predisposition but interaction and clustering of socio-biological and behavioural factors. Aim: This was a cross sectional study of prevalence of essential hypertension and associated family socio-biological factors among adult Nigerians in a primary care clinic in Eastern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in May 2011 at a primary care clinic in South Eastern Nigeria. Hypertension was defined using JNC VII criterion. Data on family socio-biological variables were obtained using pretested, structured and interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results: The prevalence of hypertension was 12.3% and 61.7% of the hypertensive patients had their diagnosis made in the hospital. There were eighty-one (41.3%) males and one hundred and fifteen(58.7%) females with sex ratio of 1: 1.4. The age ranges from 18-82 years for males with mean age of 58±12.0 years whilst for females the age ranges from 18-84 years with mean age of 63±14.2 years. Family biosocial factors significantly associated with hypertension was family size more than four (P=.045) and family history of hypertension (P=.024). The most significant family predictor variable was family history of hypertension (OR=3.49 P=.026). The patient with family history of hypertension was three and half times more likely to be hypertensive than those without family history of hypertension. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs in adult Nigerians in the primary care and is associated with family size more than four and family history of hypertension. History of hypertension in the family during clinical encounter should stimulate the need for family oriented primary care and prevention.
Keywords
Adult Nigerians, Family Socio-Biological Factors, Hypertension, Prevalence, Primary Care
To cite this article
Gabriel Uche Pascal Iloh, Agwu Nkwa Amadi, Essential Hypertension in Adult Nigerians in a Primary Care Clinic: A Cross Sectional Study of the Prevalence and Associated Family Socio-Biological Factors in Eastern Nigeria, European Journal of Preventive Medicine. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2014, pp. 81-89. doi: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20140206.11
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