Volume 2, Issue 2, March 2014, Page: 25-28
Alterations in Plasma Glucose Levels among Blood Donors
Samuel Antwi-Baffour, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Korle-Bu, Accra, Ghana
Josephine Agyaa Yobo, The Accra Area Blood Centre, Korle-bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana
Ransford Kyeremeh, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Korle-Bu, Accra, Ghana
John Tetteh, The Accra Area Blood Centre, Korle-bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana
Richard Harry Asmah, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Korle-Bu, Accra, Ghana
Patrick Ayeh-Kumi, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Korle-Bu, Accra, Ghana
Received: Apr. 24, 2014;       Accepted: May 13, 2014;       Published: May 20, 2014
DOI: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20140202.12      View  2443      Downloads  99
Abstract
Blood donors are required to meet several criteria which are intended to ensure that safe blood is made available for transfusion as well as keeping the donor safe. Plasma glucose levels may be altered immediately after blood donation. However, since plasma glucose testing is not part of the screening tests, individuals who may have low or high plasma glucose levels are likely to be passed fit to donate. This may be detrimental to their health. The objective of the study was to measure the random plasma glucose (RPG) levels in blood donors before and after donation and determine whether there is any significant change in their levels. Samples were obtained from the Accra Area Blood Centre (AABC) at the Korle-Bu teaching Hospital. Two hundred (200) subjects were recruited who were healthy individuals between the ages of 18-52 years who had satisfied the donor criteria set by the AABC. Pre-and-post donation RPG level for each sample was determined using the VitaLab Junior Selectra Clinical Chemistry analyzer. Majority of the subjects were in the age-range of 21-30 years and there were more males than females. The mean RPG concentration before donation was 5.70±2.24 mmol/l and 9.07±6.48 mmol/l afterwards. 95% confidence interval was used and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). The findings indicate that the level of RPG is altered (mostly elevated) after blood donation. Knowing pre-donation glucose levels may therefore be important in keeping the donor safe.
Keywords
Donor, Recipient, Plasma Glucose, Hyperglycaemia, Hypoglycaemia
To cite this article
Samuel Antwi-Baffour, Josephine Agyaa Yobo, Ransford Kyeremeh, John Tetteh, Richard Harry Asmah, Patrick Ayeh-Kumi, Alterations in Plasma Glucose Levels among Blood Donors, European Journal of Preventive Medicine. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2014, pp. 25-28. doi: 10.11648/j.ejpm.20140202.12
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